30th April Research Seminar
Jonathan Foyle (World Monuments Fund)              
Paradise Regained: The Rediscovered State Bed of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York as Royal Self-Image in 1485l

Friday 2nd May
The Educated Eye? Connoisseurship Now
A conference

9th May Research Lunch 
Cora Gilroy-Ware (Tate Britain)
A song the sweeter for a taste of pain: the cult of the nymph in early nineteenth century Britain

Please note that due to events there may be Public Study Room Closures


Recent Publications

  • William Henry Fox Talbot Beyond Photography, In The Olden Time Victorians and the British Past,Ham House
    William Henry Fox Talbot Beyond Photography, In The Olden Time Victorians and the British Past,Ham House
  • Four Hundred Years of Collecting and Patronage,The Buildings of England, Sussex: East with Brighton and Hove, Imperial Gothic Religious Architecture and High Anglican Culture
    Four Hundred Years of Collecting and Patronage,The Buildings of England, Sussex: East with Brighton and Hove, Imperial Gothic Religious Architecture and High Anglican Culture
  • in the British Empire, 1840-1870, Citizen Portrait: Portrait Painting and the Urban Elite of Tudor and Jacobean England and Wales, Lucie Rie: Modernist Potter
    in the British Empire, 1840-1870, Citizen Portrait: Portrait Painting and the Urban Elite of Tudor and Jacobean England and Wales, Lucie Rie: Modernist Potter



Forthcoming Events

Research Programme - Summer 2014

Autumn Research Lunch 2013

Wednesday Evening Research Seminars

18:00 - 20:00, April - June

Our Research seminars will feature papers given by distinguished historians of British art and architecture. Seminars typically take the form of hour-long talks, followed by questions and drinks, and are geared to scholars, curators, conservators, art-trade professionals and research students working on the history of British art. 


30th April - Jonathan Foyle (World Monuments Fund)              
Paradise Regained: The Rediscovered State Bed of Henry VII and Elizabeth of York as Royal Self-Image in 1485

14th May - Kate Retford (Birkbeck College, University of London)
'Bonds of Unity and Friendship': Kinship and the Conversation Piece in Eighteenth-Century England

28th May - Morna O'Neill (Wake Forest University)
The Decorative Art of Display: The Case of Hugh Lane 

11th June - Sandy Helsop (University of East Anglia)
Symmetry, Antithesis and Empathy in the St Albans Psalter

25th June - One Object, Three Voices
Mark Catesby's Natural History: The Art, the Science, the Publication
Charles Jarvis (Natural History Museum)
Leslie K. Overstreet (Smithsonian Institution, Washington)
Henrietta McBurney Ryan (Senior Fellow, PMC)

 

Friday Lunchtime Research Seminars

12.30 - 14.30, May - July

The spring programme of research lunches is geared to doctoral students and junior scholars working on the history of British art and architecture. They are informal events in which individual doctoral students and scholars talk for half-an-hour about their projects, and engage in animated discussion with their peers. A sandwich lunch, will be provided by the Centre.

9th May - Cora Gilroy-Ware (Tate Britain)
"A song the Sweeter for a Taste of Pain": The cult of the Nymph in Early Nineteenth-Century Britain

23rd May - Jamie Mulherron (National Museums Scotland)
Being and Nothingness: Perceptions of Lace 1550-1850

6th June - Sarah Longair (British Museum)
Mskiti ya Bwana Sinclair: Designing a Museum in British colonial Zanzibar
 
20th June - Nick Grindle (University College London)
George Morland: in the Margins

4th July - Catherine Spencer (University of St Andrews)
Prunella Clough's 'Structures of Mysterious purpose': Abstraction and Post-industrialization

To book your place please email the centre's Event Co-ordinator,                   Ella Fleming on efleming@paul-mellon-centre.ac.uk                                              It is essential to book in advance.

Evening Research Seminars may be recorded, and the resulting recordings may be used to publicise the Paul Mellon Centre's academic activities (on the website etc.) Recordings will also be retained permanently in the archive and made available for research purposes.

The Educated Eye? Connoisseurship Now

Unknown artist, The Connoisseur, 1830, lithograph and watercolour. Yale Center for British Art, gift of Max and Barbara Wilk

A conference at the Paul Mellon British Centre for Studies in British Art, Friday 2 May 2014

This one-day conference will address the issue of connoisseurship in relation to historic, modern and contemporary British art studies. Speakers from different spheres - art dealers, museum curators, conservators, arts journalists, and academics - will give personal 'position papers' based on their own professional perspectives and experiences of the role and relevance of connoisseurship in today's art world.  Issues to be explored include the question of the 'eye'; the value of technical knowledge and the role of conservation; the role of connoisseurship in the marketplace, including questions of attribution and market value; connoisseurship and collecting; connoisseurship and art theory; connoisseurship and art-historical scholarship; and connoisseurship's relevance to contemporary art.

Click here for the programme

Click here for ticket information

 

Enlightened Princesses Caroline,
Augusta Charlotte and the Shaping of the Modern World

Jean-Baptiste van Loo, Augusta, Princess of Wales (detail), 1742, Royal Collection Trust © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2014

International Symposium at Hampton Court Palace

7-9 July 2014

This three-day international symposium, taking place at Hampton Court Palace and associated sites, brings together eminent academicians and museum scholars to examine the roles played by Queen Caroline of Ansbach; Augusta, Princess of Wales; and Queen Charlotte in the promotion of the arts and sciences in eighteenth-century Britain. The themes that will be addressed are pertinent to exhibitions scheduled to open in 2017 at the YCBA and in London. The princesses? individual and collective interests in art, botany and gardens, natural philosophy and medicine, and the education of their children will be explored in relation to a dramatically changing social, political, and technological milieu, as will their roles in the encouragement of the British Enlightenment. The symposium is timed to take advantage of the period when various London institutions will be commemorating the anniversary of the Hanoverian Succession and aims to contribute in a major way to the general public discourse around that event.

The program includes two full days of lectures, themed panels, and special tours and events, followed by a day devoted to tours of two sites important in the lives of these royal women:

Kew Palace and its gardens, and Kensington Palace. The fee for attending the conference is £100. Reductions are available for a limited number of students on application to the conference organizer.