Past

Digital Art Histories Symposium

Lecture

  • 9 November 2016
  • 4:00 – 8:00 pm
  • 16 Bedford Square, Paul Mellon Centre

Digital Art Histories Symposium & Reception to celebrate the first year of British Art Studies

Organised by the Early Career Researcher Network

This event gathers together a panel of art historians to give short, discursive presentations about their involvement with digital projects, with plenty of time for discussion and questions. This will be followed by a talk from Rafe Hallett (University of Leeds) on the digital textual revolution.

The event will conclude with a drinks reception to celebrate the first year of British Art Studies, the online, open-access co-published by the Paul Mellon Centre and the Yale Center for British Art. We will briefly review the first year and give a taster of what is to come in the second. 

16.00: Introduction (Hana Leaper and Sophie Hatchwell)

16.10-17.40: short discursive presentations from digital pioneers, including Fern Insh (Digital Art History Research Group); Amy Jeffs (Digital Pilgrims); Katie Faulkner (Open Library of Humanities); Rebecca Hellen and Elaine Kilmurray (collaborating for British Art Studies). Followed by discussion

17.40-18.00: comfort break

18.00-18.45: Shallows & Amazon: Learning and ‘Bricolage’ in a Digital World

Dr Rafe Hallett, Director of the Leeds Institute for Teaching Excellence, will reflect on the reading habits and learning behaviour of students and scholars today, and highlight the importance of designing courses, curricula and online platforms that respond to (as well as shape) new patterns of digital reading, reference and creativity. Dr Hallett’s work draws from research interests in early modern texts and taxonomies, as well as from his role in overseeing curriculum innovation at the University of Leeds.

18.45-20.00: Drinks Reception to celebrate the first year of British Art Studies.
Join us for a drinks reception to celebrate the first year of British Art Studies, the online, open-access co-published by the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art. We will briefly review the first year and give a taster of what it to come in the second year.