Upcoming Events

Establishing a Female Lineage at the Royal Academy's Show: Eliza Trotter, Angelica Kauffman and the Intrigues of Lady Caroline Lamb

Public Lecture Course – Paris Spies-Gans

  • 27 October 2022
  • 6:00 – 7:30 pm
  • Paul Mellon Centre and Online

Recumbent woman with animal This talk will explore Eliza Trotter’s portrait of Caroline Lamb from ca. 1811 as a window onto the world of women painters in early nineteenth-century London. Among other features of these artists’ public, professional lives, it will illuminate the relationships they sought to form with one another, the networks they established with prominent patrons and their own, complex artistic self-fashioning in an art world that was designed, in principle, to exclude them and their work.

No prior art historical knowledge is necessary.

Georgian Provocations Series II is convened by Martin Postle, Senior Research Fellow at the Paul Mellon Centre.

Registration via Eventbrite is required and opens on 16 September. This series will take place in person at the Paul Mellon Centre and will also be streamed live via Zoom Webinar.

About the speaker

  • Paris Spies-Gans is an historian and historian of art with a focus on women, gender and the politics of artistic expression. Her research has been supported by fellowships from the Harvard Society of Fellows, the J. Paul Getty Trust, the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, the Yale Center for British Art, the Lewis Walpole Library and Princeton University.

    In her work, Paris prioritises the study of women artists and their writings, paintings, drawings, sculptures, prints and more. Her projects illuminate how women have navigated sociopolitical barriers to participate in their societies through diverse forms of intellectual and creative expression, even with the obstacles they regularly faced – and especially at moments of political revolution and change. Her first book, A Revolution on Canvas: The Rise of Women Artists in Britain and France, 1760–1830, was published by the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art in June 2022.